boulder slaw

boulder_slaw
What can we say about a beautiful, colorful, nutrient-filled dish that takes after its namesake (well, at least the beautiful, colorful parts)?  This salad starts with a coleslaw base, but you can add everything you like and can only make it better! It’s so flavorful, you don’t need any fancy spices.  When you see the bright colors and taste the sweet-sour dressing, you’ll be bowled over by Boulder Slaw!

Start with a coleslaw base:

shredded green and red cabbage and shredded carrots (you can use a prepared coleslaw pack, if you like)

Add:

Lots more shredded or matchstick-cut carrots
Broccoli florets, blanched 30 seconds and cut very small
Red and green bell peppers, diced
Red or sweet yellow onion, diced
½ cup fresh Italian parsley, chopped fine

Also, you could try one or two of these ingredients:

Finely chopped apples
Dried cranberries or raisins
Pineapple pieces or crushed pineapple, drained
Finely chopped mushrooms

Dressing:

½ cup sugar
½ cup white vinegar
¼ cup water
¼ cup vegetable oil
1 tsp. salt
Dash of black pepper
Dash of red (cayenne) pepper
1 tsp. celery seed

asparagus “cream” soup

asparagus "cream" soup
Asparagus is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. It has been cultivated around the world for centuries, dating as far back as ancient Egypt. What’s the secret to tender asparagus? Using a paring knife, cut a half-inch off the bottom of the stalk. If it cuts easily, it will be tender. If it resists cutting, try again a half-inch higher until you find the place where it can be sliced easily.

This soup is light, healthy and tasty. It’s great for a spring lunch or light supper. Try topping it with spicy croutons, and maybe a dollop of soy sour cream.

2 Tbs. olive oil
1/2 large yellow onion, diced (about 2/3 cup)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 15-oz. cans vegetable broth
3 carrots, peeled and diced
2 stalks celery, diced
2 bunches of medium-size asparagus (about 7 cups, when chopped into 1-inch pieces)
1 cup baby spinach leaves, chopped
6 to 8 mushrooms, chopped
1/2 cup fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, chopped
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 cup of your favorite non-dairy milk

1. Sauté onion and garlic in olive oil over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onion is transparent (about 5 minutes). Add broth, carrots, celery, and asparagus. Reduce heat. Simmer on medium-low for 30 minutes.

2. Add spinach, mushrooms, parsley, and salt. Simmer another 30 minutes.

3. Turn off heat and add soy milk; stir. Cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Serve with croutons and a dollop of soy sour cream (if desired).

living tree energy soup

Thanks to Living Tree Community Foods for providing this recipe.

The inspiration for this soup comes from several sources, including an excellent booklet, Nature’s Healing Grasses. It was written some 30 years ago by H.E. Kirschner, a physician who healed people afflicted with serious illness by putting them on a simple regimen: They would prepare a “green drink” at least once a day. It consisted of several greens, including “weeds” like malva, purslane, and lambs-quarters, as well as cultivated greens like parsley, placed in a blender and blended with pineapple juice.

I call it an “energy soup” because in my experience, it is easily digested and has the effect of enhancing one’s aliveness and well-being. We’ve been preparing “energy soup” at Living Tree Community for over a decade. We serve it at every meal. Here’s our basic recipe:

3 carrots, sliced thinly or diced
2 beets, sliced thinly or diced
1 apple or cucumber (in season), diced
Chopped parsley, celery, kale, collards, arugula, endive, spinach, cabbage, cilantro, chard, and lettuce (your choice)
Avocado
Lemon juice

Put the mixture into a blender. Add spring water or freshly made carrot juice. If you want to supercharge the drink, add a handful of wheatgrass. Blend into a thick, smooth “soup.” Serve immediately.

Variations: Grind some flax, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin, or chia seeds in a seed mill or coffee grinder and toss it in, or add a chopped apple.

mushroom barley soup

My mother usually made a crockpot of barley soup when the weather was especially frigid (and in Upstate New York, that was often). This vegan barley soup, which uses dried shitakes for an extra flavor dimension, will warm you up right down to your toes.

4-5 dried shitake mushrooms
3 Tbs. olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
1/4 cup celery, diced
1 medium yellow onion, chopped fine
1 large carrot, diced
12 oz. white mushrooms
8 cups water
1 cup pearl barley
2 bay leaves
1 tsp. sage
1 tsp. thyme
Pinch of Hungarian paprika
Salt and pepper to taste
Parsley, chopped

1. Place the shitake mushrooms in a bowl; pour boiling water over them. Cover the bowl and let the mushrooms soften for about 45 minutes. Remove the mushrooms and pour the soaking water through a cone coffee filter to remove any sediment. Reserve the strained liquid. Dice the shitakes.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large stewpot over medium heat. Sauté the garlic, celery, onion, and carrot until the onions are translucent. Add the white mushrooms and shitakes and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 minutes.

3. Add 8 cups of water, the reserved mushroom soaking liquid, barley, and bay leaves. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low. Partially cover and cook for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Add remaining spices; cook, stirring occasionally, until the barley softens (about another 30 minutes).

5. Stir in chopped parsley right before serving.

minestrone

There are many versions of minestrone; this is one of our favorites. Feel free to substitute in-season produce.

2 Tbs. olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
2 carrots, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped,
2 zucchini, sliced
3 red potatoes, peeled and cubed
3 cups cabbage, shredded
1 1/2 quarts vegetable broth or water
1 15-oz can chopped tomatoes, with liquid
1 16-oz can cannellini beans, drained
1 cup cut green beans
salt to taste

1. In large stewpot, heat olive oil. Sauté onion until semitransparent.

2. Add carrots, celery, zucchini, potatoes, cabbage, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.

3. Add remaining ingredients; simmer another 30 minutes.

bettina’s antioxidant vegetable soup

The beets give this low-calorie, energizing soup a deep fuschia color. If you like, add a cup of small pasta shapes to this soup during the last 10 minutes of simmering.

2 Tbs. olive oil
1/2 cup onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced or chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
1/2 large green pepper, diced
5-6 cups vegetable stock
2 large carrots, peeled and chopped
2 beets, peeled and diced small
2 large potatoes (white or red), peeled and chopped
1 cup green beans, trimmed and halved
1 14-oz. can kidney beans
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/4 cup Bragg’s amino acids
1 tsp. cumin
1 tsp. chili powder
1/2 tsp. tarragon
Salt and pepper to taste

1. Heat oil in a large stockpot over low-medium heat. Add onions; cover and cook until onions are soft (about 10 minutes). Add garlic, celery, and green pepper; stir well. Cover and cook for 5 minutes until vegetables are slightly softened.

2. Add stock, carrots, beets, potatoes, and green beans. Increase heat to bring soup to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer until vegetables are tender. Add remaining ingredients; stir to combine and heat through.

wisconsin summer veggie salad

Sue named this salad in honor of her Wisconsin garden, which produced not only a healthy crop of mosquitoes, but also red and green peppers and yellow squash.

1 green bell pepper, chopped
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1 small yellow squash, sliced
2 small zucchini, sliced
8 oz. mushrooms, halved
1/2 red onion, chopped
1 cucumber, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and sliced
10 cherry tomatoes, halved
1/2 cup chopped Italian parsley

dressing:
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1/2 cup raspberry or balsamic vinegar
1/2 tsp. dried dill weed
Salt and pepper to taste

Mix dressing ingredients and apply to combined chopped vegetables, or use your favorite bottled dressing (Newman’s Own Balsamic Vinaigrette is a good one to try).

taste of provence soup

This soup began as plain ol’ potato soup. It changed along the way, thanks in part to the Herbs de Provence spice blend brought back by a friend from a trip to France.

7-8 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped
8 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
6 cups vegetable broth
1 cup broccoli florets
1 can creamed corn
1 lb. chard, washed and chopped
1 tsp. Herbs de Provence spice blend
2 tsp. salt

Peel and chop potatoes, carrots, and onion and place in large soup pot. Add vegetable broth, and cook on medium heat for 30 minutes or until potatoes and carrots are tender. Add broccoli and creamed corn, lower heat, and simmer another 10 minutes. Add chard, spices, and salt. Simmer another 10 to 15 minutes. Add additional water or broth if desired.

Serve with a loaf of crusty French bread, sliced diagonally into large chunks, and pretend you’re having dinner on the south coast of France.

thai golden curry with tofu

thai golden curry with tofu
This recipe is not difficult (don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients). Prepare all items in advance, including slicing the tofu. For best results, rinse the tofu block, and then stand it on its side and slice the narrowest edge into four slices. Then lay it flat and cut into about 2-inch cubes. The slices will be 1/2-inch thick and will cook more evenly.

1/3 cup light olive oil
1 small yellow onion, finely chopped
1 Tbs. fresh ginger, minced
1/2 tsp. minced garlic
1 16-ounce package firm tofu, rinsed
1 14-ounce can light coconut milk
1/2 tsp. red pepper flakes
2 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. curry powder
1 Tbs. soy sauce
2 tsp. agave nectar OR 3 tsp. sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 large carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
1 6-ounce package baby spinach leaves

1. Place 2 Tbs. olive oil, onion, ginger, and garlic into heated large cook pot or dutch oven. Stir occasionally until onion is transparent, about 3 minutes. Add remaning olive oil and tofu and cook until tofu is lightly browned. Add a bit more oil, if necessary.

2. Add coconut milk, pepper flakes, paprika, curry powder, soy sauce, agave nectar, and salt. Stir well.

3. Spread carrot slices on top, and add spinach leaves. Cover tightly and cook on low heat for 15 minutes. Mix before serving over rice or noodles.

roasted red pepper soup

Roasting the red bell peppers results in a sweet, slightly smoky flavor. Accompanied by a salad and crusty peasant bread, this soup makes a great light supper.

2 large red bell peppers
2 Tbs. olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 large carrot, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
4 cups vegetable stock
2 Tbs. tomato paste
1/2 tsp. salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Hot sauce to taste (optional)

1. Preheat broiler. Cut bell peppers in quarters; trim and discard seeds. Place quarters on a foil-lined baking sheet. Broil for about 10 minutes or until skin blackens and peppers soften. Place peppers in a paper bag. Roll the top of the bag over to seal, and set aside for about 10 minutes.

2. Heat oil in a stewpot over medium heat. Sautè the onion, celery, carrot, and garlic for about 7 minutes. While the vegetables cook, peel the blackened skin from the roasted bell pepper quarters and coarsely chop. Add peppers to stewpot, along with vegetable stock. Add tomato paste and spices and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for about 15 minutes.

3. Use your favorite method to puree the soup: blender, immersion blender, or food processor. Heat for an additional 5 minutes. Ladle soup into serving bowls.

split pea soup

As with most soups, this one tastes best on the second day.

1 16-oz. package green split peas
1 medium onion, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and shredded
2 14-oz. cans vegetable broth
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 bay leaves
1/2 tsp. basil
1/4 tsp. ground savory

1. Carefully sort through peas and rinse. Place peas in large stewpot with onion, carrots, and broth. Add enough water to cover ingredients. Bring to a boil and cook on medium heat for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally and adding water when necessary to keep peas covered.

2. Add salt, pepper, and spices. Reduce heat and simmer on medium-low heat for 1 hour. Stir often and occasionally add water to prevent soup from becoming too thick. Remove bay leaves and serve.

vegetable grain soup

Before you prepare this soup, check your cupboards for tiny leftover amounts of grains, barley, lentils, etc. and feel free to substitute whatever you have on hand for the ingredients listed below.

2 quarts vegetable broth
1 quart water
1 small onion, chopped
2 large carrots, chopped
3 celery ribs, sliced
2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed
1/2 cup pearl barley
1/2 cup lentils
1/2 cup split peas
1/2 oz. dried mushrooms
1 large Yukon Gold potato, peeled and cubed
1 large zucchini, chopped
1 15-oz. can diced tomatoes, undrained
1/2 tsp. Hungarian paprika
1/2 tsp thyme
1/2 tsp. basil
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1. In a large soup pot over medium heat, bring the broth, water, onion, carrots, celery, and garlic to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the barley, lentils, split peas, and dried mushrooms. Continue to simmer for an additional 45 minutes.

2. Add the potato, zucchini, tomatoes, and spices and simmer for an additional 30 minutes or until the lentils and vegetables are tender. Serve hot with a rustic bread.

michelle’s spring rolls

Michelle, mother of five and a great vegan cook, submitted this recipe. You can set out the ingredients and let your guests make their own spring rolls.

2 oz. dried bean thread noodles or rice thread noodles
1 cucumber, peeled and cut in half lengthwise
12 large rice-paper wrappers (8-inch round or larger)
2 cups baby spinach leaves (or other hardy greens such as kale or romaine lettuce), cut in thin strips
1 medium carrot, cut into matchsticks
8 oz. baked, seasoned tofu, cut into 1/4-inch sticks
12 fresh basil or mint leaves
Peanut sauce for dipping

1. Place the noodles in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 5 minutes or until softened. Drain well and set aside.

2. Remove and discard the seeds in the cucumber by scraping a spoon on the center of each piece. Cut each piece into thin strips.

3. Fill a large bowl (at least several inches larger than the rice wrappers) with warm water. Soak one wrapper until soft and pliable, 20-30 seconds. Remove the rice wrapper from the water and lay flat on a counter or cutting board. Place 1-2 tablespoons of spinach leaves along one edge of the wrapper. Place an equal amount of noodles over the spinach. Top with 1 tablespoon of carrot matchsticks, several pieces of cucumber and tofu, and a basil or mint leaf.

4. Roll the wrapper, starting with the filling side, folding the ends over the filling as you roll and forming a tight cylinder. Serve with small bowls of peanut sauce for dipping.

“sausage” & lentils

Greg Lawson kindly allowed us to post his version of this classic recipe. If the vegan products aren’t available in your area, you can order them from The Mail Order Catalog, VeganEssentials, or Pangea. You can also use vegan meat substitutes you may have on hand.

2 Tbs. olive oil
4 slices Lightlife brand vegan bacon, diced (or 2 strips Primal Strips brand jerky, hickory flavored)
3 Yves brand vegan sausage links
1/2 cup diced onion
1/4 cup diced fennel bulb (optional)
1/4 cup diced carrots
2 tsp. minced garlic
1 bay leaf
1 cup brown lentils
2 sprigs fresh thyme or 1 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. hot pepper flakes
15-ounce can diced tomatoes, undrained
1.5-oz bag Stonewall’s Jerky (mild or wild)
1 stick Vegi-Deli brand Quick Stix (any flavor), cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces and halved crosswise
3 cups vegetable stock (add more stock or water if you desire, but this should not be a soup)
A shot of wine if needed (for the pan or for the cook)

Heat the olive oil. Place the vegan “bacon” in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Cook until crispy, about 3 minutes, and remove from the pan. Brown the “sausages” in the hot oil until golden (2 to 3 minutes per batch). Remove from the saucepan and set aside. Add the onions, fennel (if desired), and carrots to the saucepan and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes. Add the garlic and bay leaf and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the lentils and stir for about 1 minute. Return the browned sausages and bacon to the pan; stir in the thyme, hot pepper flakes, tomatoes, Stonewall’s Jerky, Quick Stix pieces, and vegetable stock, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a gentle simmer and cook 50 to 55 minutes, or until the lentils are tender and have soaked up most of the liquid. Remove and discard the bay leaf and thyme sprigs.

Serve the lentils and sausage with whole-grain mustard and crusty bread.

roasted root vegetable casserole

This two-for-one recipe yields a second dinner with a minimum of extra time and ingredients. Serve the roasted root vegetable casserole on the first night. On the second night, place the leftovers in a big soup pot, add a couple items, and enjoy a tasty dinner stew.

3 large white potatoes
2 yams
1 large yellow onion
1 large turnip
1 large rutabaga
5 carrots
2-3 Tbs. olive oil
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. dried Italian seasoning blend
1/2 cup water

Preheat oven to 350°. Peel all vegetables (you can scrub potatoes and leave skins on), cut into 1-inch cubes, and place in a large roasting pan. Drizzle olive oil and sprinkle spices over veggies and mix well. Add 1/2 cup water to roasting pan. Bake for 1 hour uncovered, then cover and bake for an additional hour. Serve with a colorful salad and a crusty loaf of bread; sit back and enjoy the compliments!

Day 2: Roasted Root Vegetable Soup

In a large soup pot, put leftover roasted veggies, a 10-oz package frozen cut green beans, and a quart of vegetable broth. Add just enough water to cover vegetables. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.